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This post was written by
Scott Schwertly

Scott is the Founder and CEO of Ethos3.

 

Happy Valentine’s Day everyone! In honor of this most romantic of all days, we decided to review an infographic motion piece all about the holiday. Before we jump into what we thought could have been better, let’s highlight what we like. The short piece clocks in around one and a half minutes, during which we learn lots of great, pertinent things about Valentine’s Day. You’ll certainly learn a lot you probably didn’t know about the holiday, which makes the piece a success in the most general sense.

We applaud the combination of infographic and motion; the motion design makes for a more interesting delivery, and it certainly helps to keep our attention throughout. We also really like the charts used, like when candy boxes are stacked on top of one another to denote who receives the most candy on Valentine’s Day. And our favorite part comes around the 1:08 mark when the statistic about how much chocolate the US buys for the holiday (over 1 billion!) was delivered in a dripping chocolate type. We would have liked to see that kind of conceptual representation of points more often in the piece.

With all those good things said, let’s tackle what we didn’t like as much. First things first, the clip art used throughout the piece is far from the best quality possible. In fact, the visuals are probably the weakest link in the entire piece. We rattle on and on about avoiding dreaded clip art, and here is a good example of why to avoid it. Simply put, the clip art used lends the piece an amateurish look. Avoid it at all costs.

Moreover, we’re not quite sure why there’s so much text in the piece if there’s a voiceover. The woman delivers a nice voiceover, but she essentially just reads the words to the viewer. Choose one: a voiceover, or lots of text on the screen. The words on the screen render the voiceover ineffectual, and vice versa. Never include both.

And lastly, the font used throughout the piece is called Coolvetica, which is fine is small doses, but small dosage was obviously not the case here. Coolvetica is a display font, so it looks good as a standalone font, but not as a body text. Be careful and mindful of the fonts you use in your design. Make sure they don’t inadvertently distract, or put off, the audience.

Regardless of our criticisms, we love the overall messages delivered by this motion piece, and hopefully you’ve started your day off right with a little Valentine’s Day cheer. Now, where’s the chocolate…?

 

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